Tag Archives: human resources

Survey data collection ends February 14

We’re now in the last portion of the survey data collection phase for the study, which will continue until Feb 14.

As before, I’m personally sending an email to the Chief Human Resource Officer of every four year public and private non-profit college and university in the 50 states and DC, inviting them to participate in the study and to benefit from participating by receiving our research results in advance of their publication. The surveys will be sent on a rolling basis over the next 10 days.

The updated survey takes less than 8 minutes to complete. All invitations to participate in the survey are sent from my email: weidner@sju.edu. The survey is hosted on Qualtrics (qualtrics.com), and invitees are provided a secure link to the survey.

Based on participants’ survey responses, institutions with living wage policies are asked to submit their institution’s policy (if you wish, we’ll redact all identifications of your institution), while institutions with living wage practices are asked to be interviewed (about 30 minutes) about their practices. For either branch of the study, institutions will not be identified in our research results and reports.

If you are a CHRO and haven’t received an invitation to participate in the survey, please email me: weidner@sju.edu.

If you aren’t a CHRO, please encourage your CHRO to look for the survey and complete it. Living wage policies and practices are an increasingly important subject that higher education institutions will likely need to address, either sooner or later – but we can’t learn about HR practices in higher education without your help!

Thank you!

Exciting news: 2019 AASHE presentation

It’s been awhile since my last post; folks following the blog will be hearing from me more frequently during my sabbatical, which started earlier this week…

I’m starting off the sabbatical year with great news – I’ll be presenting at the 2019 AASHE Conference & Expo in Spokane, WA (October 27-30). I’m delighted because AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, aashe.org) has been an ideal venue for me to report on my research-in-progress and meet colleagues from a range of higher education institutions. This year’s conference theme is Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy, and the conference:

“…is tackling the root cause for the continued rise in carbon emissions: our dysfunctional economic system. The conference seeks to showcase and strengthen higher education’s contributions to the movement for a sustainable economy, which we see as inclusive of the exciting work happening under a variety of other names such as the solidarity economy, wellbeing economy, circular economy, post-growth economy, regenerative economy and restorative economy…”

My contribution to the conference is a presentation on the morning of Monday, October 28:

Illuminating the Invisible: How Institutions Address and Afford Social Sustainability” (9:15-10:15 AM, Monday 28 October, Spokane, Room 300D).

Click the title above for a full description of the session.

If you are planning on attending AASHE 2019 and would like to connect at (or before/after) the conference, please drop me a note.

I hope to see you in Spokane!

 

Great news: CUPA-HR 2019 presentation!

It’s nice to have a proposal to present accepted at a conference – and it’s even nicer to have a second proposal accepted the following year.

Last week I learned that my proposal “How Do Institutions Afford Living Wage Policies?: The Costs & Benefits” has been accepted for presentation to the 2019 CUPA-HR Annual Conference in Denver October 20-22.

I’m delighted because CUPA-HR (College and University Professional Association for Human Resources, cupahr.org) is a vibrant organization drawing HR professionals from across the spectrum of public and private higher education institutions, and this project depends upon the participation of Chief Human Resource Officers at American higher education institutions. As I posted last fall, the CUPA-HR 2018 conference was terrific, and I’m looking forward to seeing how they top that this year!

I’ll update this post with my presentation date and time when the conference schedule is finalized.

If you are attending CUPA-HR, please stop by. I hope to see you there.

Reflecting on CUPA-HR

As I described in my previous post, presenting three talks at two very different conferences in a span of six days is a lot of input, particularly when the audiences have such different lenses on our common cause: improving our higher education institutions. My previous post was about the first conference (AASHE); in this post I’m writing about my presentation and experience at my first CUPA-HR Annual Conference in Indianapolis earlier this month.

At the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR, cupahr.org), I presented some of the preliminary findings from the Living Wage Policy Study. A number of CUPA-HR conference attendees were Chief Human Resource Officers (CHROs) – the very people who I am inviting to participate in the study on behalf of their institutions. During my presentation and throughout the conference, I was able to meet a number of people working in HR professionals at all levels, hailing from from small (one person) HR departments to state-wide systems, and every type of public and private institution in between. Similarly, early interviews with participants in the Living Wage Policy Study have reflected a diversity of processes used by institutions exploring or considering just employment policies and practices.

While the sustainability-focused community at AASHE (described in my previous post) is very broad, the CUPA-HR community is very deeply focused on the existing, emerging, and sometimes as-yet-unseen issues that are central to running HR functions effectively and supporting the work of our institutions. Higher education HR leaders have to be technical experts, systems administrators, people and due-process advocates, risk managers, and change agents, and those varied hats are often stacked one on top of each other. In other words, in higher education, HR deals with concerns both that run both broad and deep. One could sense that from listening to attendees – and by perusing the wide array of exhibitors at the vibrant CUPA-HR expo.

And quite an Expo it was. The CUPA-HR Expo included providers of consulting (for everything from diversity to compensation), recruitment systems, background checks, retirement planning, payroll, HRIS, third party benefits administration, and healthcare for employees and retirees – to name a few. Also present were at least two different providers of health insurance for pets (did you know that around 60% of American households own pets? I didn’t!).

One other observation about the CUPA-HR expo – and an open suggestion to organizers of others conferences: arrange plenty of seating for participants to sit down and chat, right through the middle of the expo hall – if that means getting a bigger expo hall, I recommend it. This was one of the most helpful features of the conference in terms of learning from each other and getting to know some fellow conference participants instead of simply going to the same events as other conference attendees. Combined with 30 minute breaks – which are not only more humane than but also facilitate those most-important conversations between sessions – CUPA-HR 2018 was a very well-designed conference schedule.

One of the recurring themes I heard about from conference participants was the central role they play in crafting institutional responses to events both external and internal to their institutions. Among most challenging issues that any institution faces occur when external events become internal issues, and when internal issues become external news. Whichever way those often intense cross-boundary currents are flowing, HR finds itself at the center of the institution’s response, in close collaboration with the president and other functional areas (e.g., marketing/communication, community/public relations, advancement, alumni relations, student life, to name a few).

This was my first presentation at CUPA-HR, and from a speaker’s perspective it was a very smooth process both logistically and technically. The conference app was terrific, and I am compelled to point out that the printed program was probably the best designed conference material I have seen in some time – one worth retaining. Nicely done!

I hope I am given the opportunity to present at a CUPA-HR event again, including regional and/or seasonal conferences. I’ll keep you posted here whenever I have significant news. Next year’s CUPA-HR Annual Conference and Expo is in Aurora CO, October 20-22, 2019. I hope to see you there!

Second presentation added @ AASHE 2018

My talk “A Primer on Living Wage Policies and Just Employment” was upgraded from a poster session to a presentation and added to the 2018 AASHE Conference & Expo in Pittsburgh. The presentation is Wednesday October 3 at 8:30 am in Convention Center 317. This is a 30-minute compact “on-ramp” for anyone who wants to learn about living wage policies and just employment.

And if you want to learn more, later that morning, I’ll be presenting “This Justice In: Updated Results From the Living Wage Policy Study” at 11:30 (also in Convention Center 317). I’ve revised my earlier post about AASHE (from July) to reflect the new information.

If you’re attending AASHE, or would like to connect in Pittsburgh, please drop me a note (weidner@sju.edu)!