Tag Archives: AASHE

AASHE 2020 Conference presentations (great news)

I have some great news…I’ve been formally notified that I’ve had two proposals for presentations accepted by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) for its 2020 Global Conference on Sustainability in Higher Education. AASHE has provided a welcoming venue for my research since 2016 and provided opportunities for my work to reach administrators, students, and faculty across higher education. I’m delighted to be part of this year’s virtual conference, which runs October 20-22. The theme of the conference is “Mobilizing for a Just Transition,” which I think is particularly fitting now because we will have numerous opportunities to challenge our thinking about why we do things the way we’ve done them as we eventually emerge to the “next normal.”

The first presentation is titled (Some of the) Surprising Findings About Living Wages in Higher Education During a Global Pandemic. I framed the presentation this way so I could include some of the most interesting and surprising things I learned through both my study of living wage policies and practices at 4-year institutions (first quarter of 2020) and my just concluded study of community colleges. This talk is in a 15-minute “On-Demand Lightning Talk” format, so this talk will be fast. I promise it will be informative, and I will do my best to make it fun.

The second presentation is titled: “Your Mileage May Vary”: Creating Your Institution’s Roadmap to Just Employment. This talk is also intended to be inclusive of attendees from both 4-year institutions and community colleges. I’ll be sharing what I’ve learned (primarily through interviews with Chief Human Resources Officers) about the different paths that institutions have taken to enacting written living wage policies or adopting unwritten living wage practices. Participants will be able to apply that information in a way that best fits their institution’s intentions and situation. This session was originally proposed as a half-day pre-conference workshop, but that format has been discontinued with the change to a virtual conference; it is now a 40-minute “SimuLive” session, which will include a live Q&A segment during the session. I’m very happy with both format changes, especially so for this session, which will be available to many more people within the basic conference price.

The terrific folks at AASHE are reimagining the conference from the ground up, and the peek I’ve had at behind-the-scenes looked awesome. You can catch all the details at the link at the top of this post.

I look forward to connecting at the conference with colleagues — both new and familiar — who are interested in social sustainability.  See you in October!

 

Reflecting on AASHE (with shout-outs!)

Presenting three talks at two very different conferences in a span of six days is a lot of input, particularly when the audiences have such different lenses on our common causes: improving our higher education institutions. This post is about the first conference (AASHE); in a separate post I’ll write about CUPA-HR.

At the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE, aashe.org) in Pittsburgh (Oct 3),  I talked with with an interesting mix of students, faculty, and staff in a variety of different roles. The conference theme was the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and there was heightened sense of urgency to take action on climate change was palpable; this past Monday the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its landmark report Global Warming of 1.5º C is sobering about what needs to be done.

This was my third consecutive year presenting at this conference; for folks unfamiliar with AASHE it is very broad “tent” with a primary emphasis toward environmental sustainability. The expo hall includes everything from electric cars/carts to customized recycling containers to bike share and campus scooter programs to carbon-footprint tracking and academic programs in sustainability from many different perspectives. There’s a whole lot of green building going on out there!

The sizable area of poster sessions at AASHE included everything from thermostat control initiatives (Wesleyan U) to “blender bikes” (Ohio U) to making “bag boards” from compressed plastic bags (UNC-Wilmington). Social sustainability – such as the focus of my project – is a bit of a niche within AASHE. If audience size from year to year is any indication, it is an area of growing interest – and concern – in American higher education. I was grateful for the opportunity to contribute to our ongoing conversation.

It was a lot of fun to explore my material from different perspectives in each of my two AASHE talks. My introductory session on living wage policies attracted a number of students, and an intermediate level session for people familiar with the living wage concept, where were able to talk in greater detail about what I’ve learned so far through this project and compare notes with practitioners. And some folks came for both (you know who you are – thank you!).

Between the two sessions, I was able to chat with a public policy graduate student from just down the street here in Philadelphia, sustainability coordinators from coast to coast (and all points in between), and adjunct and tenure track faculty in public and private institutions.

I’m looking forward to continuing to work with AASHE, and I’ll keep you posted here whenever I have significant news. Next year’s AASHE conference is in Spokane WA, October 27-30, 2019. I hope to see you there.

Second presentation added @ AASHE 2018

My talk “A Primer on Living Wage Policies and Just Employment” was upgraded from a poster session to a presentation and added to the 2018 AASHE Conference & Expo in Pittsburgh. The presentation is Wednesday October 3 at 8:30 am in Convention Center 317. This is a 30-minute compact “on-ramp” for anyone who wants to learn about living wage policies and just employment.

And if you want to learn more, later that morning, I’ll be presenting “This Justice In: Updated Results From the Living Wage Policy Study” at 11:30 (also in Convention Center 317). I’ve revised my earlier post about AASHE (from July) to reflect the new information.

If you’re attending AASHE, or would like to connect in Pittsburgh, please drop me a note (weidner@sju.edu)!

2018 AASHE presentations (updated 9/19)

Updated (Sep 18 2018): AASHE asked if I’d be willing to convert my poster session (announced below in July) to a presentation – and of course I’m delighted to do so. This post has been the edited to reflect the current information on both presentations.

More good news. I’ve had two proposals accepted for presentation at the 2018 AASHE Conference & Expo in Pittsburgh (October 2-4). I’m delighted because AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, aashe.org) is a rapidly growing organization centered on higher education, and brings together everyone from students to staff to academics, all acting on their commitments to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that inspired the theme to this year’s conference, “Global Goals: Rising to the Challenge.”

Both presentations are on Wednesday, October 3:

A Primer on Living Wage Policies and Just Employment(8:30-9:00 am, Convention Center 317).

This presentation is a compact introduction to living wage and just employment issues.

This Justice In: Updated Results From the Living Wage Policy Study(11:30-12:30, Convention Center 317) 

This presentation begins at a more intermediate level and provides me more time to work with participants during my session presentation.

My engagement with AASHE began in October 2016 with my first AASHE conference presentation (with Elizabeth Sohmer in Baltimore), and put me on the path toward this project.

If you’re attending AASHE, or would like to connect in Pittsburgh, please drop me a note!

Living wage webinar video

Thank you to everyone who participated in my AASHE webinar, Socially Sustainable: Living Wage Policies in American Higher Education, on Wednesday (Feb 21 2018), especially to AASHE for the opportunity to report some of the preliminary results from phase 1 of the Living Wage Policy Study.

While I’ve taught online graduate courses for several years, this was my first webinar – on any subject – and I enjoyed learning about the process. Special thanks to AASHE Education Programs Manager Daita Serghi who was terrific to work with and makes it look easy.

In my experience, writing and presenting material in depth helps me attain clarity about what I know and what I don’t know, and preparing for this presentation was no exception.

The webinar and presentation materials are available to AASHE members on the AASHE Campus Sustainability Hub. A video of the webinar is viewable here or click the title slide below.

AASHE Webinar 2-21-2018 Socially Sustainable Living Wage Policies in American Higher Education Weidner in use.001