Author Archives: Ken Weidner

What do the 2019 AP Preseason Top 25 College Football Poll and our 2018 list of institutions with publicly-available living wage policies have in common? More than you might think.

You know autumn is just around the corner when the AP releases its annual pre-season poll of sportswriters and broadcasters ranking the top 25 college football teams. Since I both teach and earned my degrees at institutions that don’t play NCAA football, I don’t have a strong on-field rooting interest…

…but whenever I see a list a schools, I refer back to this project and last year’s (2018) list of 32 American higher education institutions (HEIs) with (either all or part of) a living wage policy publicly available on their institution’s website – that about 1% of all four year HEIs (see my AASHE webinar here).

It looks as though schools with (preseason) top-ranked football teams are more likely to have some form of living wage policy than the larger population of all institutions. Out of the 25 teams making the 2019 preseason poll, only 3 institutions were on last year’s living wage policy – that’s 12% of teams in the poll. Only 1 of the 21 teams “also receiving votes” in the poll is on the living wage policy list, so out of all 46 teams receiving votes, about 8.5% of the are on the living wage policy list.

The four teams/institutions are 16th ranked Auburn University (2018 Living Wage Policy score 40), 19th ranked University of Wisconsin (35), 25th ranked Stanford University of Wisconsin-Madison (90), and “also-receiving votes” but unranked Utah State University (20).

I’m pondering this: If all 3,000+ four year institutions in America had living wage policies at the same rate as the 46 vote-getting schools in the AP preseason football poll, there would be over 250 institutions with some sort of living wage policy (instead of 32).

This fall I’m soliciting participation from chief human resource officers (CHROs) in this project to answer that question. As before, I’ll be asking if living wage policies and/or practices are in effect. I’ll be asking institutions with policies to provide them, and I’ll be inviting CHROs at colleges with living wage policies or practices to be interviewed about their institution’s practices. Of particular interest to me is (a) how those living wage policies came about, and (b) the financial impact of those policies on institutions.

Exciting news: 2019 AASHE presentation

It’s been awhile since my last post; folks following the blog will be hearing from me more frequently during my sabbatical, which started earlier this week…

I’m starting off the sabbatical year with great news – I’ll be presenting at the 2019 AASHE Conference & Expo in Spokane, WA (October 27-30). I’m delighted because AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, aashe.org) has been an ideal venue for me to report on my research-in-progress and meet colleagues from a range of higher education institutions. This year’s conference theme is Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy, and the conference:

“…is tackling the root cause for the continued rise in carbon emissions: our dysfunctional economic system. The conference seeks to showcase and strengthen higher education’s contributions to the movement for a sustainable economy, which we see as inclusive of the exciting work happening under a variety of other names such as the solidarity economy, wellbeing economy, circular economy, post-growth economy, regenerative economy and restorative economy…”

My contribution to the conference is a presentation on the morning of Monday, October 28:

Illuminating the Invisible: How Institutions Address and Afford Social Sustainability” (9:15-10:15 AM, Monday 28 October, Spokane, Room 300D).

Click the title above for a full description of the session.

If you are planning on attending AASHE 2019 and would like to connect at (or before/after) the conference, please drop me a note.

I hope to see you in Spokane!

 

Great news: CUPA-HR 2019 presentation!

It’s nice to have a proposal to present accepted at a conference – and it’s even nicer to have a second proposal accepted the following year.

Last week I learned that my proposal “How Do Institutions Afford Living Wage Policies?: The Costs & Benefits” has been accepted for presentation to the 2019 CUPA-HR Annual Conference in Denver October 20-22.

I’m delighted because CUPA-HR (College and University Professional Association for Human Resources, cupahr.org) is a vibrant organization drawing HR professionals from across the spectrum of public and private higher education institutions, and this project depends upon the participation of Chief Human Resource Officers at American higher education institutions. As I posted last fall, the CUPA-HR 2018 conference was terrific, and I’m looking forward to seeing how they top that this year!

I’ll update this post with my presentation date and time when the conference schedule is finalized.

If you are attending CUPA-HR, please stop by. I hope to see you there.

On the 2019 NCAA women’s bracket & living wage policies

Today I’m taking a look at the 2019 NCAA Division I women’s basketball tournament bracket (yesterday I provided some decidedly non-expert analysis of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament). I’m methodically completing my women’s brackets, trying to decide whether strength-of-schedule, conferences, geographical or academic loyalties, mascots, or school colors are sufficient to overrule seedings and produce upsets. As with this year’s men’s tournament, I can’t pick an all-Jesuit women’s final four this year because only three Jesuit institutions have teams in the tournament – Gonzaga (5), Marquette (5), and Fordham (14) – although all three of them could (in theory) make it to the final four…

…as with the men’s tournament yesterday, I refer back to this project and last year’s (2018) list of 32 American higher education institutions (HEIs) with (either all or part of) a living wage policy publicly available on their institution’s website – that about 1% of all four year HEIs (see my AASHE webinar here).

Out of the 64 teams making the 2019 women’s tournament, five institutions made last year’s list – just under 8 percent of the field. Those institutions are 2 seed Stanford (2018 Living Wage Policy score 85), 10 seed Auburn University (45), 6 seed UCLA (70), 8 seed University of California (70), and 15 seed UC Davis (70).

Three of those teams are in the upper half of their regional bracket (i.e., 8 seed or higher), but three of them are in the same first and second round grouping playing at Stanford, which means at best three of these five teams can make it to the “sweet 16.”

Notably, Auburn was the only institution to field teams in both the men’s and women’s tournaments and have (all or part of) a living wage policy.

I’m interested to see if additional tournament teams have instituted living wage policies since last year. I’m about to begin soliciting participation from chief human resource officers (CHROs) in our 2019 data collection effort to answer that question. As before, I’ll be asking if living wage policies and/or practices are in effect; I’ll be asking institutions with policies to provide them, and I’ll be inviting CHROs at colleges with living wage practices to be interviewed about their institution’s practices.

NCAA men’s bracket & living wage policies (for entertainment purposes only)

It’s March Madness Monday for fans of the annual NCAA men’s basketball tournament, which begins later this week. This is the day when work productivity across American slows to a crawl as people fill out brackets based on seedings, possible upsets, strength-of-schedule, conferences, geographical or academic loyalties, mascots, and school colors. Already I’m scrambling to create a bracket, as my standard all-Jesuit final four can’t happen this year because at most two of the three Jesuit institutions with teams in the tournament – Gonzaga (1), Marquette (5), and Saint Louis (13) – can make it to the final four…

…but whenever I see a list a schools, I refer back to this project and last year’s (2018) list of 32 American higher education institutions (HEIs) with (either all or part of) a living wage policy publicly available on their institution’s website – that about 1% of all four year HEIs (see my AASHE webinar here).

Out of the 68 teams making the 2019 men’s tournament, six institutions made last year’s list – that’s 8 percent of the field. Those institutions are 13 seed UC Irvine (2018 Living Wage Policy score 70), 5 seed Auburn University (45), 5 seed University of Wisconsin-Madison (35), 8 seed Virginia Commonwealth (25), 8 seed Utah State (20), and 4 seed Virginia Tech (20).

Five of those teams are in the upper half of their regional bracket (i.e., 8 seed or higher), and five of the six can make it to the “sweet 16” (with an upset, UC Irvine can play Wisconsin later this week in San Jose – go Anteaters!).

I’m interested to see if additional tournament teams have instituted living wage policies since last year. I’m about to begin soliciting participation from chief human resource officers (CHROs) in our 2019 data collection effort to answer that question. As before, I’ll be asking if living wage policies and/or practices are in effect; I’ll be asking institutions with policies to provide them, and I’ll be inviting CHROs at colleges with living wage practices to be interviewed about their institution’s practices.

Go Anteaters!